Accessibility navigation


'he perceives himself as a caterpillar […]' constructions of the disabled subject in the critical response to Alfred Hitchcock's 'Rear Window'

Cocks, N. (2015) 'he perceives himself as a caterpillar […]' constructions of the disabled subject in the critical response to Alfred Hitchcock's 'Rear Window'. In: Lesnik-Oberstein, K. (ed.) Rethinking Disability Theory and Practice: Challenging Essentialism. Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke, pp. 165-184. ISBN 9781137456977

Full text not archived in this repository.

It is advisable to refer to the publisher's version if you intend to cite from this work. See Guidance on citing.

Abstract/Summary

This chapter focuses on critical responses to Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear Window, especially their construction of disability. The suggestion is that such criticism takes the disabled body to be both necessary and superfluous to the meaning of the film, a difficulty that, I argue, can be read more widely within film theory. Ever since Christian Metz’s ‘the Imaginary Signifier’, the condition of being ‘bound to a wheelchair’ is understood to have a resonance for theories of film spectatorship, but only ever in a sense that does away with the wheelchair as a mark of difference.

Item Type:Book or Report Section
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Science > Language Text and Power
Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Science > Minority Identities
ID Code:40671
Publisher:Palgrave Macmillan

University Staff: Request a correction | Centaur Editors: Update this record

Page navigation