Accessibility navigation


Washington's growth and opportunity act or Beijing's 'Overarching Brilliance': will African governments choose neither?

Davies, J. E. (2011) Washington's growth and opportunity act or Beijing's 'Overarching Brilliance': will African governments choose neither? Third World Quarterly, 32 (6). pp. 1147-1163. ISSN 1360-2241

[img]
Preview
Text - Accepted Version
· Please see our End User Agreement before downloading.

328kB

It is advisable to refer to the publisher's version if you intend to cite from this work. See Guidance on citing.

To link to this item DOI: 10.1080/01436597.2011.586228

Abstract/Summary

Growing criticism of Chinese engagement in Africa centres on the risk to African development posed by China's aggressive export policies and the threat to the Washington Consensus and African governance posed by China's 'non-interference' approach to engagement. This article challenges both these assumptions. The growth of Chinese trade has a wide range of impacts, depending on the sector in question, and the current terms of trade Washington extends to Africa under the auspices of the AGOA do not result in uniformly beneficial effects. With regard to African governance, it is argued that the 'Washington Consensus' has been based on competing and often muddled perceptions of US national interest. This fact tempers the regret felt at Washington's loss of influence over the good governance agenda. Evidence is provided to show that China can work within properly regulated countries and industries, if the African governments in question can provide fair, efficient and transparent environments in which to operate.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:No Reading authors. Back catalogue items
ID Code:40822
Publisher:Routledge

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

University Staff: Request a correction | Centaur Editors: Update this record

Page navigation