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Promoting microbial immobilization of soil nitrogen during restoration of abandoned agricultural fields by organic additions

Szili-Kovacs, T., Torok, K., Tilston, E. L. and Hopkins, D. W. (2007) Promoting microbial immobilization of soil nitrogen during restoration of abandoned agricultural fields by organic additions. Biology and Fertility of Soils, 43 (6). pp. 823-828. ISSN 0178-2762

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1007/s00374-007-0182-1

Abstract/Summary

Application of organic materials to soils to enhance N immobilization into microbial biomass, thereby reducing inorganic N concentrations, was studied as a management option to accelerate the reestablishment of the native vegetation on abandoned arable fields on sandy soils the Kiskunsag National Park, Hungary. Sucrose and sawdust were used at three different topographic sites over 4 years. N availability and extractable inorganic N concentrations were significantly reduced in all sites. Soil microbial biomass C and microbial biomass N increased significantly following C additions, but the microbial C to microbial N ratio remained unaffected. It is concluded that the combined application of the rapidly utilized C source (sucrose) promoted N immobilization, whereas the addition of the slowly utilized C source (sawdust) maintained the elevated microbial biomass C and microbial biomass N in the field.

Item Type:Article
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Soil Research Centre
ID Code:4138
Uncontrolled Keywords:immobilization soil microbial biomass sucrose sawdust restoration EXTRACTION METHOD BIOMASS-C SUCCESSION DYNAMICS CARBON DECOMPOSITION AVAILABILITY GRASSES COMMUNITIES GRASSLANDS
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