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Using experimental archaeology and micromorphology to reconstruct timber-framed buildings from Roman Silchester: a new approach

Banerjea, R. Y., Fulford, M., Bell, M., Clarke, A. and Matthews, W. (2015) Using experimental archaeology and micromorphology to reconstruct timber-framed buildings from Roman Silchester: a new approach. Antiquity, 89 (347). pp. 1174-1188. ISSN 0003-598X

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To link to this item DOI: 10.15184/aqy.2015.108

Abstract/Summary

Determining the internal layout of archaeological structures and their uses has always been challenging, particularly in timber-framed or earthen walled buildings where doorways and divisions are difficult to trace. In temperate conditions however, soil formation processes may hold the key to understanding how buildings were used. The abandoned Roman town of Silchester, UK, provides a perfect case study for testing a new approach combining experimental archaeology and micromorphology. The results show that this technique can resolve previously uncertain features of urban architecture such as the presence of a roof and the changes in internal organisation and use over time.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Department of Archaeology
ID Code:43408
Publisher:Antiquity Publications

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