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Considerations on the use of the p-nitrophenyl phosphomonoesterase assay in the study of the phosphorus nutrition of soil borne fungi

Tibbett, M. (2002) Considerations on the use of the p-nitrophenyl phosphomonoesterase assay in the study of the phosphorus nutrition of soil borne fungi. Microbiological Research, 157 (3). pp. 221-231. ISSN 0944-5013

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1078/0944-5013-00154

Abstract/Summary

The p-nitrophenyl phosphomonoesterase assay (p NPPase) is commonly used to measure cell-wall-associated and extracellular phosphatase activity of soil fungi. p NPPases are usually assayed in the context of fungal nutrition, where inorganic P supply might be enhanced by the mineralisation of monoester organic P sources in the soil. The importance of the assay to the P nutrition of soil fungi is considered based on the evidence currently available including the consistency of methodological approach. The nature of organic P in the soil and the relevance of the assay to some specific soil substrates is discussed, particularly the chemistry and bioavailability of myo-inositol hexakisphosphate and the lower inositol phosphates. The evidence for the long-term stability of p NPPases in the soil is examined in the light of the persistence of p NPPase in soils. The role of persistent extracellular fungal p NPPases in the soil P cycle is discussed. Conclusions from p NPPase based studies must be based upon an appreciation of the constraints of the assay and the complex chemistry of organic P and p NPPase in the soil.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Agriculture, Policy and Development > Biodiversity, Crops and Agroecosystems Division > Centre for Agri-environmental Research (CAER)
ID Code:45425
Publisher:Elsevier

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