Accessibility navigation


Low-temperature-induced changes in trehalose, mannitol and arabitol associated with enhanced tolerance to freezing in ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetes ( Hebeloma spp.)

Tibbett, M., Sanders, F. E. and Cairney, J. W. G. (2002) Low-temperature-induced changes in trehalose, mannitol and arabitol associated with enhanced tolerance to freezing in ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetes ( Hebeloma spp.). Mycorrhiza, 12 (5). pp. 249-255. ISSN 0940-6360

Full text not archived in this repository.

It is advisable to refer to the publisher's version if you intend to cite from this work. See Guidance on citing.

To link to this item DOI: 10.1007/s00572-002-0183-8

Abstract/Summary

Ectomycorrhizal fungi have been shown to survive sub-zero temperatures in axenic culture and in the field. However, the physiological basis for resistance to freezing is poorly understood. In order to survive freezing, mycelia must synthesise compounds that pro-tect the cells from frost damage, and certain fungal-spe-cific soluble carbohydrates have been implicated in this role. Tissue concentrations of arabitol, mannitol and trehalose were measured in axenic cultures of eight Hebeloma strains of arctic and temperate origin grown at 22, 12, 6 and 2°C. In a separate experiment, mycelia were frozen to –5°C after pre-conditioning at either 2°C or 22°C. For some, especially temperate strains, there was a clear increase in specific soluble carbohydrates at lower growth temperatures. Trehalose and mannitol were present in all strains and the highest concentrations (close to 2.5% and 0.5% dry wt.) were recorded only after a cold period. Arabitol was found in four strains only when grown at low temperature. Cold pre-condi-tioning enhanced recovery of mycelia following freez-ing. In four out of eight strains, this was paralleled by increases in mannitol and trehalose concentration at low temperature that presumably contribute towards cryopro-tection. The results are discussed in an ecological con-text with regard to mycelial overwintering in soil.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Agriculture, Policy and Development > Biodiversity, Crops and Agroecosystems Division > Centre for Agri-environmental Research (CAER)
ID Code:45427
Publisher:Springer

University Staff: Request a correction | Centaur Editors: Update this record

Page navigation