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Monuments, mobility and Medieval perceptions of designed landscapes: The Pleasance, Kenilworth

Jamieson, E. and Lane, R. (2015) Monuments, mobility and Medieval perceptions of designed landscapes: The Pleasance, Kenilworth. Medieval Archaeology, 59 (1). pp. 255-271. ISSN 0076-6097

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1080/00766097.2015.1119394

Abstract/Summary

The Pleasance was a ’virandarium’ or pleasure garden, constructed by Henry V in the grounds of his castle at Kenilworth. Despite its high academic profile and the survival of well-preserved earthwork remains, the Pleasance has never previously been subjected to a programme of detailed archaeological survey and investigation. This article discusses the results of a new analytical earthwork survey undertaken by staff from English Heritage in 2012. It considers the contribution that these new findings make to the wider debate on medieval designed landscapes, with a particular focus on mobility and its role in unlocking the meaning and symbolism embedded in elite landscapes.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Department of Archaeology
ID Code:48502
Publisher:Taylor & Francis

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