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Comparative genomic, proteomic and exoproteomic analyses of three Pseudomonas strains reveals novel insights into the phosphorus scavenging capabilities of soil bacteria

Lidbury, I. D. E. A., Murphy, A., Scanlan, D. J., Bending, G. D., Jones, A. M. E., Moore, J. D., Goodall, A., Hammond, J. P. and Wellington, E. (2016) Comparative genomic, proteomic and exoproteomic analyses of three Pseudomonas strains reveals novel insights into the phosphorus scavenging capabilities of soil bacteria. Environmental Microbiology, 18 (10). pp. 3535-3549. ISSN 1462-2920

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1111/1462-2920.13390

Abstract/Summary

Bacteria that inhabit the rhizosphere of agricultural crops can have a beneficial effect on crop growth. One such mechanism is the microbial-driven solubilisation and remineralisation of complex forms of phosphorus (P). It is known that bacteria secrete various phosphatases in response to low P conditions. However, our understanding of their global proteomic response to P stress is limited. Here, exoproteomic analysis of Pseudomonas putida BIRD-1 (BIRD-1), Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 and Pseudomonas stutzeri DSM4166 was performed in unison with whole-cell proteomic analysis of BIRD-1 grown under phosphate (Pi) replete and Pi deplete conditions. Comparative exoproteomics revealed marked heterogeneity in the exoproteomes of each Pseudomonas strain in response to Pi depletion. In addition to well-characterised members of the PHO regulon such as alkaline phosphatases, several proteins, previously not associated with the response to Pi depletion, were also identified. These included putative nucleases, phosphotriesterases, putative phosphonate transporters and outer membrane proteins. Moreover, in BIRD-1, mutagenesis of the master regulator, phoBR, led us to confirm the addition of several novel PHO-dependent proteins. Our data expands knowledge of the Pseudomonas PHO regulon, including species that are frequently used as bioinoculants, opening up the potential for more efficient and complete use of soil complexed P.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Centre for Food Security
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Soil Research Centre
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Agriculture, Policy and Development > Biodiversity, Crops and Agroecosystems Division > Crops Research Group
ID Code:65774
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell

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