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Effect of temperature, relative humidity and aphid developmental stage on the efficacy of the mycoinsecticide Mycotal® against Myzus persicae

Mohammed, A. A. and Hatcher, P. E. (2016) Effect of temperature, relative humidity and aphid developmental stage on the efficacy of the mycoinsecticide Mycotal® against Myzus persicae. Biocontrol Science and Technology, 26 (10). pp. 1379-1400. ISSN 1360-0478

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1080/09583157.2016.1207219

Abstract/Summary

The green peach aphid, Myzus persicae, is a major pest worldwide. An examination of the impact of temperature, relative humidity and developmental stages of M. persicae on the efficacy of the whitefly mycoinsecticide Mycotal®, based on Lecanicillium muscarium and the effects of infection on aphid fecundity was evaluated under controlled conditions. Although this fungus can be grown at a broad range of temperatures (15-30oC), the optimum temperature for control of M. persicae ranged between 20 and 30oC. L. muscarium had high efficacy as a microbial control against M. persicae between 55 and 90% relative humidity. Total mortality of aphids treated with different spore dosages of L. muscarium varied according to the developmental stage: adults, fourth and third instar nymphs of proved more susceptible than first instar nymphs. Although the fungus did not affect the rate of nymph production, the reproductive period of aphids significantly decreased with increasing the spore dosage. Thus, total fecundity of treated aphids was 22.6 ± 1.1 and 31.6 ± 2.4 offspring per adult at the medium (644 ± viable spore/mm2) and low (330 ± 40 viable spore/mm2) dosages, compared with 45.7 ± 4.3 offspring per untreated aphid. The results suggest that L. muscarium has the potential as a biological control agent of M. persicae. However, fungal infection appears to have no sub-lethal effects on the fitness of the host’s progeny.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Biological Sciences > Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
ID Code:66144
Publisher:Taylor and Francis

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