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Anglo-Saxon economy and ecology by a downland stream: a waterlogged sequence from the Anglo-Saxon royal settlement at Lyminge, Kent

Maslin, S. P. (2018) Anglo-Saxon economy and ecology by a downland stream: a waterlogged sequence from the Anglo-Saxon royal settlement at Lyminge, Kent. Environmental Archaeology: the Journal of Human Palaeoecology, 23 (2). pp. 137-151. ISSN 1461-4103

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1080/14614103.2016.1271852

Abstract/Summary

Palaeoecological and geoarchaeological investigations which cover the Anglo-Saxon period are rare, particularly in chalk downland landscapes which are considered to have limited palaeoenvironmental potential. The present study explores a sequence which can be directly related to the occupation history of the major Anglo-Saxon settlement at Lyminge, Kent. This work demonstrated a sequence of palaeochannels and organic deposits associated with the latter part of an archaeological sequence which spans the 5th to the 11th centuries AD. A range of evidence for the environment and economic activity is presented which suggests landscape continuity, possibly stretching back as far as the Romano-British period. The sequence revealed worked wood and evidence for livestock management and cereal cultivation, some of which is contemporary with the final phases of occupation of a 7th century ‘great hall complex’ and its subsequent transformation into a royal monastery. Agricultural activity following the abandonment of the pre-monastic settlement area caused this stream margin to become gradually buried by ploughwash which displaced the channel over time and sealed the organic deposits. It is incredibly rare to find such organic preservation in direct association with an Anglo-Saxon downland rural settlement and this is the first time that such a sequence has been analysed in association with the latter phases of a known Anglo-Saxon royal and monastic centre.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Department of Archaeology
ID Code:68485
Publisher:Taylor & Francis

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