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Pigs and cattle in Gaul: the role of Gallic societies in the evolution of husbandry practices

Fremondeau, D., Nuviala, P. and Duval, C. (2017) Pigs and cattle in Gaul: the role of Gallic societies in the evolution of husbandry practices. European Journal of Archaeology, 20 (3). pp. 494-509. ISSN 1741-2722

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1017/eaa.2016.10

Abstract/Summary

In this article we present a comparative study of pig and cattle morphologies, and stable isotope analysis relating to pig demographic management at Levroux Les Arènes (Indre, France), to evaluate changes in husbandry practices between the Iron Age and the Roman period in Gallic societies. Results indicate the establishment of new production and distribution structures, probably before the second century BC, along with the implementation of a specific size/weight selection for the specialized production of pork. Pig and cattle size evolves progressively from the end of the third century BC. These changes are likely to be the result of an internal evolution within Gallic societies, based on local herds, but possibly they are a response to a broader changing economic climate. Within the Western Roman Empire, each province, and Italy, follows its own evolutionary pattern, which also differs between pig and cattle, suggesting that each region adapted its husbandry strategies according to its agro-pastoral characteristics, capacities, or ambitions.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Scientific Archaeology
Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Department of Archaeology
ID Code:69133
Publisher:Maney

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