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Endocrine disruptors and obesity

Darbre, P. (2017) Endocrine disruptors and obesity. Current Obesity Reports, 6 (1). pp. 18-27. ISSN 2162-4968

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1007/s13679-017-0240-4

Abstract/Summary

The purpose of this review is to summarise current evidence that some environmental chemicals may be able to interfere in endocrine regulation of energy metabolism and adipose tissue structure. Recent findings demonstrate that such endocrine disrupting chemicals, termed “obesogens”, can promote adipogenesis and cause weight gain. This includes compounds to which the human population is exposed in daily life through their use in pesticides/herbicides, industrial and household products, plastics, detergents, flame retardants and ingredients in personal care products. Animal models and epidemiological studies have shown that an especially sensitive time for exposure is in utero or the neonatal period. In summarising the actions of obesogens, it is noteworthy that as their structures are mainly lipophilic, their ability to increase fat deposition has the added consequence of increasing the capacity for their own retention. This has the potential for a vicious spiral not only of increasing obesity but also increasing retention of other lipophilic pollutant chemicals with an even broader range of adverse actions. This might offer an explanation as to why obesity is an underlying risk factor for so many diseases including cancer.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Biological Sciences > Biomedical Sciences
ID Code:69252
Publisher:Springer

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