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Electric vehicles and low voltage grid: impact of uncontrolled demand side response

Hattam, L., Vukadinovic Greetham, D., Haben, S. and Roberts, D. (2017) Electric vehicles and low voltage grid: impact of uncontrolled demand side response. In: 24th International Conference on Electricity Distribution, 12-15 June 2017, Glasgow, pp. 1073-1076.

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Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1049/oap-cired.2017.0651

Abstract/Summary

We are looking at the impact of electric vehicles (EV) charging from low voltage (LV) networks. Based on the data obtained from two different pilot projects: 1. Mini-E trial where EV users were incentivised to charge during the night; 2. My Electric Avenue trial where there were no similar incentives, we want to quantify the impact of EV charging, presuming that the number of home-charging EV users will increase significantly in the near future. By assuming that the current load at individual household level is known or inferred, simulations are performed to estimate the future load. We look at different percentages of EV uptake and model clustered scenarios, where the social networking effect is imposed - users adopt an EV with a higher probability if their neighbour already has one. Our simulations demonstrate that incentivising night-time charging can create large new peaks during the night, which could have negative effects on low voltage networks. On the other hand, simulations based on the data with no incentives shows that naturally occurring diversity in charging behaviour does not automatically result in comparable network stress at the same penetrations.

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Mathematical, Physical and Computational Sciences > Department of Mathematics and Statistics
Faculty of Science > School of Mathematical, Physical and Computational Sciences > Department of Mathematics and Statistics > Centre for the Mathematics of Human Behaviour (CMOHB)
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Energy Research
ID Code:69917
Publisher Statement:This paper was first published at CIRED.

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