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Health equality, social justice and the poverty of autonomy

Newdick, C. (2017) Health equality, social justice and the poverty of autonomy. Health Economics, Policy and Law, 12 (4). pp. 411-433. ISSN 1744-134X

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1017/S1744133117000093

Abstract/Summary

How does the concept of autonomy assist public responses to ‘lifestyle’ diseases? Autonomy is fundamental to bioethics, but its emphasis on self-determination and individuality hardly supports public health policies to eat and drink less, and take more exercise. Autonomy rejects a ‘nanny’ state. Yet, the cost of diseases caused by obesity is increasing to individuals personally and to public health systems generally. Health care systems are under mounting and unsustainable pressure. What is the proper responsibility of individuals, governments and corporate interests working within a global trading environment? When public health care resources are unlikely to increase, we cannot afford to be so diffident to the cost of avoidable diseases.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Science > School of Law
ID Code:70106
Publisher:Cambridge University Press

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