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Repair or destruction: an intimate liaison between ubiquitin ligases and molecular chaperones in proteostasis

Kevei, E., Pokrzywa, W. and Hoppe, T. (2017) Repair or destruction: an intimate liaison between ubiquitin ligases and molecular chaperones in proteostasis. FEBS Letters, 591 (17). pp. 2616-2635. ISSN 0014-5793

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1002/1873-3468.12750

Abstract/Summary

Cellular differentiation, developmental processes, and environmental factors challenge the integrity of the proteome in every eukaryotic cell. The maintenance of protein homeostasis, or proteostasis, involves folding and degradation of damaged proteins, and is essential for cellular function, organismal growth, and viability [1, 2]. Misfolded proteins that cannot be refolded by chaperone machineries are degraded by specialized proteolytic systems. A major degradation pathway regulating cellular proteostasis is the ubiquitin/proteasome-system (UPS), which regulates turnover of damaged proteins that accumulate upon stress and during aging. Despite the large number of structurally unrelated substrates, ubiquitin conjugation is remarkably selective. Substrate selectivity is mainly provided by the group of E3 enzymes. Several observations indicate that numerous E3 ubiquitin ligases intimately collaborate with molecular chaperones to maintain the cellular proteome. In this Review, we provide an overview of specialized quality control E3 ligases playing a critical role in the degradation of damaged proteins. The process of substrate recognition and turnover, the type of chaperones they team up with, and the potential pathogeneses associated with their malfunction will be further discussed

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Biological Sciences > Biomedical Sciences
ID Code:71375
Publisher:Elsevier

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