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Writing and power in the Roman world: literacies and material culture

Eckardt, H. (2018) Writing and power in the Roman world: literacies and material culture. Cambridge University Press, New York, pp260. ISBN 9781108418058

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1017/9781108284172

Abstract/Summary

At the heart of this book lies the nature of the relationship between the material culture of writing and socio-cultural identities in the Roman period. Literacy was an important skill in the ancient world, and power could be exercised over and through texts. Writing equipment was displayed on monuments and placed into burials to display status as well as age and gender. This book offers a new angle on Roman literacies by examining a previously neglected object, metal inkwells. It explores their forms, chronology and distribution across the Roman Empire and analyses social and economic meanings through the funerary data. Men, women, adults and children were buried with writing equipment but practices varied over time and in different parts of the Empire. The book reviews recent work on ancient literacies and adds a distinctive material turn to our understanding of this crucial skill and the embodied practices of its use.

Item Type:Book
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Social Archaeology
Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Department of Archaeology
ID Code:72665
Publisher:Cambridge University Press

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