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Health and economic benefits of building ventilation interventions for reducing indoor PM2.5 exposure from both indoor and outdoor origins in urban Beijing, China

Yuan, Y., Luo, Z., Liu, J., Wang, Y. and Lin, Y. (2018) Health and economic benefits of building ventilation interventions for reducing indoor PM2.5 exposure from both indoor and outdoor origins in urban Beijing, China. Science of the Total Environment, 626. pp. 546-554. ISSN 0048-9697

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.01.119

Abstract/Summary

China is confronted with serious PM2.5 pollution, especially in the capital city of Beijing. Exposure to PM2.5 could lead to various negative health impacts including premature mortality. As people spend most of their time indoors, the indoor exposure to PM2.5 from both indoor and outdoor origins constitutes the majority of personal exposure to PM2.5 pollution. Different building interventions have been introduced to mitigate indoor PM2.5 exposure, but always at the cost of energy expenditure. In this study, the health and economic benefits of different ventilation intervention strategies for reducing indoor PM2.5 exposure are modelled using a representative urban residence in Beijing, with consideration of different indoor PM2.5 emission strengths and outdoor pollution. Our modelling results show that the increase of envelope air-tightness can achieve significant economic benefits when indoor PM2.5 emissions are absent; however, if an indoor PM2.5 source is present, the benefits only increase slightly in mechanically ventilated buildings, but may show negative benefit without mechanical ventilation. Installing mechanical ventilation in Beijing can achieve annual economic benefits ranging from 200yuan/capita to 800yuan/capita if indoor PM2.5 sources exist. If there is no indoor emission, the annual benefits above 200yuan/capita can be achieved only when the PM2.5 filtration efficiency is no less than 90% and the envelope air-tightness is above Chinese National Standard Level 7. Introducing mechanical ventilation with low PM2.5 filtration efficiency to current residences in urban Beijing will increase the indoor PM2.5 exposure and result in excess costs to the residents

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of the Built Environment > Construction Management and Engineering > Innovative and Sustainable Technologies
ID Code:74886
Publisher:Elsevier

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