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Is the membrane estrogen receptor, GPER1, a promiscuous receptor that modulates nuclear estrogen receptor-mediated functions in the brain?

Vajaria, R. and Vasudevan, N. (2018) Is the membrane estrogen receptor, GPER1, a promiscuous receptor that modulates nuclear estrogen receptor-mediated functions in the brain? Hormones and Behavior. ISSN 0018-506X

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.yhbeh.2018.06.012

Abstract/Summary

Estrogen signals both slowly to regulate transcription and rapidly to activate kinases and regulate calcium levels. Both rapid, non-genomic signaling as well as genomic transcriptional signaling via intracellular estrogen receptors (ER)s can change behavior. Rapid non-genomic signaling is initiated from the plasma membrane by a G-protein coupled receptor called GPER1 that binds 17β-estradiol. GPER1 or GPR30 is one of the candidates for a membrane ER (mER) that is not only highly expressed in pathology i.e. cancers but also in several behaviorally-relevant brain regions. In the brain, GPER1 signaling, in response to estrogen, facilitates neuroprotection, social behaviors and cognition. In this review, we describe several notable characteristics of GPER1 such as the ability of several endogenous steroids as well as artificially synthesized molecules to bind the GPER1. In addition, GPER1 is localized to the plasma membrane in breast cancer cell lines but may be present in the endoplasmic reticulum or the Golgi apparatus in the hippocampus. Unusually, GPER1 can also translocate to the perinuclear space from the plasma membrane. We explore the idea that subcellular localization and ligand promiscuity may determine the varied downstream signaling cascades of the activated GPER1. Lastly, we suggest that GPER1 can act as a modulator of ERα-mediated action on a convergent target, spinogenesis, in neurons that in turn drives female social behaviors such as lordosis and social learning.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Biological Sciences > Biomedical Sciences
ID Code:78152
Uncontrolled Keywords:Crosstalk, Growth factor receptors, Kinase activation, Non-genomic signaling, Signal transduction, Social behaviors, Spinogenesis, Subcellular localization
Publisher:Elsevier

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