Accessibility navigation


The effect of the alternative prey, Paramecium caudatum (Peniculida: Parameciidae), on the predation of Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae) by the copepods Macrocyclops albidus and Megacyclops viridis (Cyclopoida: Cyclopidae)

Cuthbert, R. N., Callaghan, A. and Dick, J. T. A. (2019) The effect of the alternative prey, Paramecium caudatum (Peniculida: Parameciidae), on the predation of Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae) by the copepods Macrocyclops albidus and Megacyclops viridis (Cyclopoida: Cyclopidae). Journal of Medical Entomology, 56 (1). pp. 276-279. ISSN 1938-2928

[img]
Preview
Text - Accepted Version
· Please see our End User Agreement before downloading.

518kB

It is advisable to refer to the publisher's version if you intend to cite from this work. See Guidance on citing.

To link to this item DOI: 10.1093/jme/tjy155

Abstract/Summary

Biological control can be an effective tool to combat public health risks associated with mosquito-borne disease. However, target impacts of biological control agents may be reduced by biotic contexts such as the presence of alternative prey. In turn, this can impede our ability to realistically assess biocontrol agent efficacy. Here, we examine the effects of alternative ciliate prey on the predation potential of two cyclopoid copepods, Macrocyclops albidus Jurine (Cyclopoida: Cyclopidae) and Megacyclops viridis Jurine (Cyclopoida: Cyclopidae), towards larvae of the West Nile virus vector mosquito Culex pipiens Linnaeus (Diptera: Culicidae). Using functional responses (FRs; resource use under different resource densities), we demonstrate that both copepods exhibit potentially destabilising Type II FRs towards mosquito prey. However, where the alternative prey was present, we observed species-specific modulations to FR form and magnitude. For M. albidus, FRs remained Type II where ciliate prey were present, however, maximum feeding rates on mosquito larvae were reduced. Conversely, for M. viridis, FRs moved towards more stabilising Type III, whilst maximum feeding rates on mosquito larvae were not significantly reduced. Whilst both species of cyclopoid copepod were able to effectively target and consume larval mosquitoes in the presence of alternative prey, we demonstrate that overall efficacies may be reduced in aquatic habitats which contain multiple prey types. We thus advocate that biotic contexts such as prey selectivity should be integrated into predatory biocontrol agent examinations for mosquitoes which vector pathogens and parasites, to more holistically assess their efficacy.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Biological Sciences > Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
ID Code:79221
Publisher:Oxford Academic

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

University Staff: Request a correction | Centaur Editors: Update this record

Page navigation