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Evidence for birch bark tar use as an adhesive and decorative element in Early Iron Age central Italy: technological and socio-economic implications

Morandi, L. F., Porta, S. N. and Ribechini, E. (2018) Evidence for birch bark tar use as an adhesive and decorative element in Early Iron Age central Italy: technological and socio-economic implications. Archaeometry, 60 (5). pp. 1077-1087. ISSN 1475-4754

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1111/arcm.12362

Abstract/Summary

Archaeological excavations carried out in Early Iron Age Vetulonia (northern Tuscany, Italy) brought to light a funerary urn particularly noteworthy for the presence of an unusual decoration obtained by plastering the vase surface with an organic dark grey substance, on which metal strips were originally fixed. In order to reveal the origin of such coating, it was chemically studied by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Chemical analysis not only revealed that birch bark tar was used as coating/adhesive material for the manufacture of the urn, but also allowed us to discuss the significance of the vessel in terms of eco‐technological knowledge and possible cultural connections on a large geographical scale.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Department of Archaeology
ID Code:79344
Uncontrolled Keywords:Archaeology, History
Publisher:Wiley

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