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Full hydrodynamic reversibility of the weak dimerization of vancomycin and elucidation of its interaction with VanS monomers at clinical concentration

Phillips-Jones, M. K., Lithgo, R., Dinu, V., Gillis, R. B., Harding, J. E., Adams, G. G. and Harding, S. E. (2017) Full hydrodynamic reversibility of the weak dimerization of vancomycin and elucidation of its interaction with VanS monomers at clinical concentration. Scientific Reports, 7 (1). 12697. ISSN 2045-2322

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-12620-z

Abstract/Summary

The reversibility and strength of the previously established dimerization of the important glycopeptide antibiotic vancomycin in four different aqueous solvents (including a medically-used formulation) have been studied using short-column sedimentation equilibrium in the analytical ultracentrifuge and model-independent SEDFIT-MSTAR analysis across a range of loading concentrations. The change in the weight average molar mass M w with loading concentration was consistent with a monomer-dimer equilibrium. Overlap of data sets of point weight average molar masses M w(r) versus local concentration c(r) for different loading concentrations demonstrated a completely reversible equilibrium process. At the clinical infusion concentration of 5 mg.mL(-1) all glycopeptide is dimerized whilst at 19 µg.mL(-1) (a clinical target trough serum concentration), vancomycin was mainly monomeric (<20% dimerized). Analysis of the variation of M w with loading concentration revealed dissociation constants in the range 25-75 μM, commensurate with a relatively weak association. The effect of two-fold vancomycin (19 µg.mL(-1)) appears to have no effect on the monomeric enterococcal VanS kinase involved in glycopeptide resistance regulation. Therefore, the 30% increase in sedimentation coefficient of VanS on adding vancomycin observed previously is more likely to be due to a ligand-induced conformational change of VanS to a more compact form rather than a ligand-induced dimerization.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of the Built Environment > Architecture
ID Code:79594
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group

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