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Who trusts others? Community and individual determinants of social capital in a low income country

Asadullah, M. N. (2017) Who trusts others? Community and individual determinants of social capital in a low income country. Cambridge Journal of Economics, 41 (2). pp. 515-544. ISSN 1464-3545

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1093/cje/bew027

Abstract/Summary

This study presents new evidence on individual and community-specific determinants of social trust using data from 96 villages in Bangladesh. We find perceived institutional trust to be positively correlated with stated inter-personal trust. At the same time, there is significant social distance among various faith groups in our data: both Hindus and Muslims trust their coreligionists more than they trust those from other religions. Moreover, Hindus trust Christians, Buddhists and NGO workers more than Muslims, and are not distrustful of the wider society.Trust towards non-Muslims is negatively correlated with Islamic school attendance among Muslim respondents, while religiosity tends not to play any role. Compared to religion, the effects of institutional trust and local economic development are modest. These findings are robust to control for a range of individual- and community-level correlates, and enumerator fixed effects.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Science > School of Politics, Economics and International Relations > Economics
ID Code:79736
Publisher:Oxford University Press

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