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Plants growing on contaminated and brownfield sites appropriate for use in Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development terrestrial plant growth test

Sinnett, D. E., Lawrence, V. K., Hutchings, T. R. and Hodson, M. E. (2011) Plants growing on contaminated and brownfield sites appropriate for use in Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development terrestrial plant growth test. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, 30 (1). pp. 124-131. ISSN 1552-8618

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1002/etc.360

Abstract/Summary

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Terrestrial plant test is often used for the ecological risk assessment of contaminated land. However, its origins in plant protection product testing mean that the species recommended in the OECD guidelines are unlikely to occur on contaminated land. Six alternative species were tested on contaminated soils from a former Zn smelter and a metal fragmentizer with elevated concentrations of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn. The response of the alternative species was compared to two species recommended by the OECD; Lolium perenne (perennial ryegrass) and Trifolium pratense (red clover). Urtica dioica (stinging nettle) and Poa annua (annual meadow-grass) had low emergence rates in the control soil so may be considered unsuitable. Festuca rubra (chewings fescue), Holcus lanatus (Yorkshire fog), Senecio vulgaris (common groundsel), and Verbascum thapsus (great mullein) offer good alternatives to the OECD species. In particular, H. lanatus and S. vulgaris were more sensitive to the soils with moderate concentrations of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn than the OECD species.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Department of Geography and Environmental Science
Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Earth Systems Science
ID Code:8040
Uncontrolled Keywords:Seedling emergence; Ecotoxicology; Monocotyledon; Dicotyledon; Bioassay
Publisher:Wiley

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