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The persistent objector rule in the work of the international law commission on the identification of customary international law

Green, J. A. (2018) The persistent objector rule in the work of the international law commission on the identification of customary international law. In: Francioni, F., Ronzitti, N., Sacerdoti, G. and Pavoni, R. (eds.) The Italian Yearbook of International Law. Brill, pp. 175-188. ISBN 9789004391796

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1163/22116133-02701011

Abstract/Summary

The persistent objector rule is a well-known but controversial mechanism for a state to exempt itself from norms of customary international law. This article examines the rule with a specific focus on the work of the International Law Commission (ILC) on the Identification of Customary International Law, through a consideration of Conclusion 15 and the commentary to it that have been adopted, as well as the ILC plenary debates on the topic. The state usage and, indeed, very existence of the rule is considered, given that this has been so controversial in the ILC and wider literature. The article further examines whether the rule rightly formed an aspect of the Commission’s work, and looks at the terminology employed in Conclusion 15. Finally, it assesses the requirements for the operation of the persistent objector rule as expressed by the ILC.

Item Type:Book or Report Section
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Science > School of Law
ID Code:81657
Publisher:Brill

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