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Input usage, output mix and industry deregulation: an analysis of the Australian dairy manufacturing industry

Balcombe, K., Doucouliagos, H. and Fraser, I. (2007) Input usage, output mix and industry deregulation: an analysis of the Australian dairy manufacturing industry. Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, 51 (2). pp. 137-156. ISSN 1364-985X

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-8489.2007.00370.x

Abstract/Summary

In this paper we estimate a Translog output distance function for a balanced panel of state level data for the Australian dairy processing sector. We estimate a fixed effects specification employing Bayesian methods, with and without the imposition of monotonicity and curvature restrictions. Our results indicate that Tasmania and Victoria are the most technically efficient states with New South Wales being the least efficient. The imposition of theoretical restrictions marginally affects the results especially with respect to estimates of technical change and industry deregulation. Importantly, our bias estimates show changes in both input use and output mix that result from deregulation. Specifically, we find that deregulation has positively biased the production of butter, cheese and powders.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Agriculture, Policy and Development
ID Code:8277
Uncontrolled Keywords:Bayesian, deregulation, output distance function, STOCHASTIC FRONTIER MODELS, DISTANCE FUNCTION-APPROACH, TECHNICAL, EFFICIENCY, PROCESSING-INDUSTRY, EUROPEAN RAILWAYS, PRODUCTIVITY

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