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A safety evaluation of genetically modified feedstuffs for livestock production; the fate of transgenic DNA and proteins

Beever, D. E., Glenn, K. and Phipps, R. H. (2003) A safety evaluation of genetically modified feedstuffs for livestock production; the fate of transgenic DNA and proteins. Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences, 16 (5). pp. 764-772. ISSN 1011-2367

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Abstract/Summary

dTwo genetic constructs used to confer improved agronomic characteristics, namely herbicide tolerance (HT) in maize and soyabean and insect resistance (Bt) in maize, are considered in respect of feeding to farm livestock, animal performance and the nutritional value and safety of animal products. A review of nucleic acid (DNA) and protein digestion in farm livestock concludes that the frequency of intact transgenic DNA and proteins of GM and non-GM crops being absorbed is minimal/non existent, although there is some evidence of the presence of short fragments of rubisco DNA of non-GM soya in animal tissues. It has been established that feed processing (especially heat) prior to feeding causes significant disruption of plant DNA. Studies with ruminant and non-ruminant farm livestock offered GM feeds demonstrated that animal performance and product composition are unaffected and that there is no evidence of transgenic DNA or proteins of current GM in the products of animals consuming such feeds. On this evidence, current HT and Bt constructs represent no threat to the health of animals, or humans consuming the products of such animals. However as new GM constructs become available it will be necessary to subject these to rigorous evaluation.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Agriculture, Policy and Development
ID Code:8292
Uncontrolled Keywords:genetically modified crops, DNA, proteins, feed processing, digestion, ruminants, non-ruminants, animal performance, product composition, NUCLEIC-ACIDS, FEEDING VALUE, BT CORN, EQUIVALENT, CHICKENS, SOYBEANS, CATTLE

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