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The art of governing contingency: rethinking the colonial history of diamond mining in Sierra Leone

D'Angelo, L. (2016) The art of governing contingency: rethinking the colonial history of diamond mining in Sierra Leone. Historical Research, 89 (243). pp. 136-157. ISSN 0950-3471

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1111/1468-2281.12103

Abstract/Summary

This article briefly outlines the history of the colonial diamond industry of Sierra Leone from 1930 to 1961, highlighting its contingent aspects and the bonds guiding the decisions and actions taken by local social actors in different contexts and at different times. By drawing on colonial documents and memoirs of colonial officers, it shows how the colonial government of Sierra Leone and the mining company that exercised a monopoly on diamond extraction collaborated on the establishment of a series of legislative and disciplinary devices that encompassed forms of biopolitical expertise.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:No Reading authors. Back catalogue items
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Agriculture, Policy and Development > Economic and Social Sciences Division > Livelihoods Research
ID Code:84323
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell

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