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Urban hedges: a review of plant species and cultivars for ecosystem service delivery in north-west Europe

Blanusa, T., Garratt, M., Cathcart-James, M., Hunt, L. and Cameron, R. W. F. (2019) Urban hedges: a review of plant species and cultivars for ecosystem service delivery in north-west Europe. Urban Forestry & Urban Greening, 44. 126391. ISSN 1618-8667

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.ufug.2019.126391

Abstract/Summary

Urban hedges provide a number of important ecosystem services (ESs) including microclimate alteration, flood and pollution mitigation, and biodiversity provision, along with some disservices (DSs, e.g. invasiveness, allergenicity). However, hedge plant species differ in their capacity to promote different services, so it is important that the decision to plant hedges is evidence-based. The objectives of this study were thus to (i) to review the role of urban hedges within NW Europe; (ii) review the available literature detailing the ESs and DSs provided by different plant species and cultivars when used as hedge plants; (iii) identify where there is a lack of evidence for certain species or ESs/DSs; and (iv) develop a starting point for a discussion about appropriate species/cultivar selection to deliver multiple ESs, and avoid DSs. Many studies consider biodiversity and air quality ESs. There are significant gaps in the literature relating to rainfall mitigation/flood protection, but also CO2 sequestration, allergenicity and human psychological well-being impact of different species. Additionally, for noise and pollution mitigation studies, a range of methodologies and units are used, making comparisons between hedge species difficult/impossible. A number of common hedge species demonstrated high levels of ESs delivery, including Fagus sylvatica, Crataegus monogyna, Ilex aquifolium and Rosa rugosa. No species surveyed had an entirely negative association with ESs, and most provide at least some benefits in supporting ESs provision (e.g. Viburnum tinus, Laurus nobilis). We created a matrix, in a table form, linking plant species, key plant traits and ESs/DSs, which should make it easier for professionals to choose species best suited to provide multiple benefits, whilst minimising the drawbacks. Our review suggests that the relative contribution of urban hedges to ESs delivery may be under-valued currently, and calls for more research.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Biological Sciences > Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Agriculture, Policy and Development > Biodiversity, Crops and Agroecosystems Division > Centre for Agri-environmental Research (CAER)
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Agriculture, Policy and Development > Biodiversity, Crops and Agroecosystems Division > Crops Research Group
ID Code:84998
Uncontrolled Keywords:biodiversity, garden, green infrastructure, pollution, rainfall mitigation, well-being
Publisher:Elsevier

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