Accessibility navigation


Lesser pots go places: the attic 'brand' in Macedonia and Thrace

Smith, A. and Volioti, K. (2019) Lesser pots go places: the attic 'brand' in Macedonia and Thrace. In: Classical Pottery of the Northern Aegean and its Periphery (480-323/300 BC). Proceedings of the International Archaeological Conference. Thessaloniki, May 17-20, 2017, 17-20 May 2017, Thessaloniki, pp. 175-187.

[img] Text - Published Version
· Restricted to Repository staff only until 31 July 2020.
· The Copyright of this document has not been checked yet. This may affect its availability.

1MB
[img] Text (Author proof) - Published Version
· Restricted to Repository staff only
· The Copyright of this document has not been checked yet. This may affect its availability.

664kB

It is advisable to refer to the publisher's version if you intend to cite from this work. See Guidance on citing.

Abstract/Summary

This article brings together data from recent excavations that contradicts the traditional understanding that the presence of Attic figured pottery in Macedonia denotes ‘high culture’. The lesser Attic pots that travelled to Macedonia and elsewhere neither represent high art nor advertise the best Athens had to offer by way of culture. In lieu of the ‘contact’ concept regarding the diffusion of culture, which is a traditional by-product of colonization, through which locals receive, rather than exchange, ideas, styles, and tastes from foreigners, i.e. the ‘push model’, we suggest a pull model’, whereby the developing tastes of the populations of Macedonia at the beginning of the 5th c. pulled merchants with Attic wares to their sophisticated, cosmopolitan local markets. There is accordingly an appreciation for the lesser and later productions of Attic vases. In this paper, we offer an economic understanding of the trade in these vessels, as commodities, and hypothesize about marketing (language) whereby they were sold. We also consider the relevance of the juxtaposition of large and finely decorated Attic wares—decorated in both black- and red-figure—with lesser wares and with metals and other indicators of conspicuous consumption.

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Science > School of Humanities > Classics > Ure Museum
Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Science > School of Humanities > Classics
ID Code:85511

University Staff: Request a correction | Centaur Editors: Update this record

Page navigation