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Foods derived from animals: the impact of animal nutrition on their nutritive value and ability to sustain long-term health

Givens, D. I. and Shingfield, K. J. (2004) Foods derived from animals: the impact of animal nutrition on their nutritive value and ability to sustain long-term health. Nutrition Bulletin, 29. pp. 325-332.

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-3010.2004.00444.x

Abstract/Summary

Foods derived from domestic animals are a significant source of nutrients in the UK diet. However, certain aspects of some animal-derived foods, notably levels of saturated fatty acids, have given rise to concerns that these foods may contribute to the risk of cardiovascular disease, the metabolic syndrome and other conditions. However, the composition of the many animal-derived foods is not constant and can often be enhanced by manipulating the nutrition of the animal. This paper reviews these possibilities with particular attention to lipids, and draws attention to the fact that milk in particular, contains a number of compounds which may, for example, exert anti-carcinogenic effects. It is clear that the role of animal nutrition in creating foods closer to the optimum composition for long-term human health will not only be more relevant in the future, but will be vital in attempts to improve the health of the human population.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Agriculture, Policy and Development
ID Code:8583
Uncontrolled Keywords:animal nutrition, food, health, nutritive value

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