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Dysregulated cell signalling and reduced satellite cell potential in ageing muscle

Patel, K., Simbi, B., Ritvos, O., Vaiyapuri, S. and Dhoot, G. K. (2019) Dysregulated cell signalling and reduced satellite cell potential in ageing muscle. Experimental Cell Research, 385 (2). 111685. ISSN 0014-4827

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.yexcr.2019.111685

Abstract/Summary

Aberrant activation of signalling pathways has been postulated to promote age related changes in skeletal muscle. Cell signalling activation requires not only the expression of ligands and receptors but also an appropriate environment that facilitates their interaction. Here we first examined the expression of SULF1/SULF2 and members of RTK (receptor tyrosine kinase) and the Wnt family in skeletal muscle of normal and a mouse model of accelerated ageing. We show that SULF1/SULF2 and these signalling components, a feature of early muscle development are barely detectable in early postnatal muscle. Real time qPCR and immunocytochemical analysis showed gradual but progressive up-regulation of SULF1/SULF2 and RTK/Wnt proteins not only in the activated satellite cells but also on muscle fibres that gradually increased with age. Satellite cells on isolated muscle fibres showed spontaneous in vivo satellite cell activation and progressive reduction in proliferative potential and responsiveness to HGF (hepatocyte growth factor) and dysregulated myogenic differentiation with age. Finally, we show that SULF1/SULF2 and RTK/Wnt signalling components are expressed in progeric mouse muscles at earlier stage but their expression is attenuated by an intervention that promotes muscle repair and growth.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Biological Sciences > Biomedical Sciences
ID Code:86864
Publisher:Elsevier

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