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Linking farmer and beekeeper preferences with ecological knowledge to improve crop pollination

Breeze, T. D., Boreaux, V., Cole, L., Dicks, L., Klein, A.-M., Pufal, G., Balzan, M. V., Bevk, D., Bortolotti, L., Petanidou, T., Mand, M., Pinto, M. A., Scheper, J., Stanisavljević, L., Stavrinides, M. C., Tscheulin, T., Varnava, A. and Kleijn, D. (2019) Linking farmer and beekeeper preferences with ecological knowledge to improve crop pollination. People and Nature, 1 (4). pp. 562-572. ISSN 2575-8314

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1002/pan3.10055

Abstract/Summary

1. Pollination by insects is a key input into many crops, with managed honeybees often being hired to support pollination services. Despite substantial research into pollination management, no European studies have yet explored how and why farmers managed pollination services and few have explored why beekeepers use certain crops. 2. Using paired surveys of beekeepers and farmers in 10 European countries, this study examines beekeeper and farmer perceptions and motivations surrounding crop pollination. 3. Almost half of the farmers surveyed believed they had pollination service deficits in one or more of their crops. 4. Less than a third of farmers hired managed pollinators, however most undertook at least one form of agri-environment management known to benefit pollinators, although few did so to promote pollinators. 5. Beekeepers were ambivalent towards many mass flowering crops, with some beekeepers using crops for their honey that other beekeepers avoid because of perceived pesticide risks. 6. The findings highlight a number of largely overlooked knowledge gaps that will affect knowledge exchange and co-operation between the two groups.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Agriculture, Policy and Development > Biodiversity, Crops and Agroecosystems Division > Centre for Agri-environmental Research (CAER)
ID Code:87037
Publisher:Wiley

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