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The testimony of the spirit, the decline of Calvinism, and the origins of restoration rational religion

Cromartie, A. (2019) The testimony of the spirit, the decline of Calvinism, and the origins of restoration rational religion. Journal of Ecclesiastical History. ISSN 1469-7637 (In Press)

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Abstract/Summary

The mid-seventeenth century turn to moralism in English Protestant theology – exemplified here by ‘Ignorance’ in Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress – involved a clear rejection of the Calvinistic doctrine of the ‘internal testimony’ of scripture. The upshot was the emergence of a religious impulse that emphasised the salience of a ‘rational account’ of scripture’s credibility. The shift is conventionally traced through Richard Hooker, William Chillingworth, and the Cambridge Platonists. Hooker was, however, more Calvinist and Chillingworth more Laudian than has been recognised. The Cambridge Platonists and their ‘latitudinarian’ successors emerged from and were shaped by puritan culture.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Science > Early Modern Research Centre (EMRC)
Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Science > School of Politics, Economics and International Relations > Politics and International Relations
ID Code:87556
Publisher:Cambridge University Press

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