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Near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) to predict biological parameters of maize silage: effects of particle comminution, oven drying temperature and the presence of residual moisture

Lovett, D. K., Deaville, E. R., Givens, D. I., Finlay, M. and Owen, E. (2005) Near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) to predict biological parameters of maize silage: effects of particle comminution, oven drying temperature and the presence of residual moisture. Animal Feed Science and Technology, 120 (3-4). pp. 323-332. ISSN 0377-8401

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1016/j.anifeedsci.2005.02.001

Abstract/Summary

Maize silage nutritive quality is routinely determined by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS). However, little is known about the impact of sample preparation on the accuracy of the calibration to predict biological traits. A sample population of 48 maize silages representing a wide range of physiological maturities was used in a study to determine the impact of different sample preparation procedures (i.e., drying regimes; the presence or absence of residual moisture; the degree of particle comminution) on resultant NIR prediction statistics. All silages were scanned using a total of 12 combinations of sample pre-treatments. Each sample preparation combination was subjected to three multivariate regression techniques to give a total of 36 predictions per biological trait. Increased sample preparations procedure, relative to scanning the unprocessed whole plant (WP) material, always resulted in a numerical minimisation of model statistics. However, the ability of each of the treatments to significantly minimise the model statistics differed. Particle comminution was the most important factor, oven-drying regime was intermediate, and residual moisture presence was the least important. Models to predict various biological parameters of maize silage will be improved if material is subjected to a high degree of particle comminution (i.e., having been passed through a 1 mm screen) and developed on plant material previously dried at 60 degrees C. The extra effort in terms of time and cost required to remove sample residual moisture cannot be justified. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Agriculture, Policy and Development
ID Code:8848
Uncontrolled Keywords:maize silage, near infrared reflectance spectroscopy, residual, moisture, drying temperature, particle comminution, ORGANIC-MATTER DIGESTIBILITY, IN-VITRO DIGESTIBILITY, CHEMICAL-COMPOSITION, UNDRIED SAMPLES, GRASS-SILAGE, CALIBRATION, SPECTRA, VIVO

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