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Changing management in Scottish birch woodlands: a potential threat to local invertebrate biodiversity

Woodcock, B. A., Leather, S. R. and Watt, A. D. (2003) Changing management in Scottish birch woodlands: a potential threat to local invertebrate biodiversity. Bulletin of Entomological Research, 93 (2). pp. 159-167. ISSN 0007-4853

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1079/ber2003227

Abstract/Summary

The silvicultural management of Scottish birch woodlands for timber production is replacing traditional low intensity management practices, such as domesticated livestock grazing. These new management practices involve thinning of existing woodlands to prescribed densities to maximize biomass and timber quality. Although presently infrequent, the wide scale adoption of this practice could affect invertebrate community diversity. The impact of these changes in management on Staphylinidae and Carabidae (Coleoptera) in 19 woodlands in Aberdeenshire, north-east Scotland was investigated. Grazing and logging practices were important determinants of beetle community structure. Woodland area had no effect on any measure of beetle community structure, although isolation did influence the abundance of one carabid species. Changes towards timber production forestry will influence the structure of invertebrate communities, although the scale at which this occurs will determine its effect.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Agriculture, Policy and Development
ID Code:9398
Uncontrolled Keywords:BEETLES COLEOPTERA, PITFALL TRAPS, CARABIDAE, STAPHYLINIDAE, COMMUNITIES, DIVERSITY, QUALITY, FAUNA

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