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The effect of acetylsalicylic acid and oxalic acid on Myzus persicae and Aphidius colemani

Karatolos, N. and Hatcher, P. E. (2009) The effect of acetylsalicylic acid and oxalic acid on Myzus persicae and Aphidius colemani. Entomologia Experimentalis Et Applicata, 130 (1). pp. 98-105. ISSN 0013-8703

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1111/j.1570-7458.2008.00797.x

Abstract/Summary

Plants can respond to damage by pests with both induced direct defences and indirect defences by the attraction of their natural enemies. Foliar application of several plant-derived chemicals, such as salicylic acid and oxalic acid, can induce these defence mechanisms. The effect of acetylsalicylic acid and oxalic acid on the aphid Myzus persicae Sulzer (Homoptera: Aphididae) and its parasitoid Aphidius colemani Viereck (Hymenoptera: Aphidiidae) was investigated. Experiments were carried out with direct application of acetylsalicylic and oxalic acids on these insects, as well as choice and no-choice tests using foliar application of both chemicals on Brussels sprouts plants, Brassica oleracea var. gemmifera L. (Brassicaceae). Parasitoids were given a choice between treated and untreated plants for oviposition, and the effects of the chemicals on aphid and parasitoid development were determined. Although direct application of both chemicals increased aphid mortality, their foliar application did not induce resistance against aphids. The foliar application of such compounds, even in low concentration as shown in the choice tests, has the potential to induce indirect plant defences against aphids by encouraging aphid parasitisation. Although the direct application of both chemicals reduced parasitoid emergence from their hosts, the foliar application of acetylsalicylic acid and low concentrations of oxalic acid did not have a negative effect on parasitoid emergence ability. However, 10 mm oxalic acid reduced the number of emerged parasitoids in no-choice experiments. This study shows that foliar application of acetylsalicylic and oxalic acids has the potential to encourage aphid parasitisation, but care is needed as high concentrations of oxalic acid can have a negative effect on these beneficial organisms.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Biological Sciences
ID Code:9632
Uncontrolled Keywords:green peach aphid, Aphididae, Homoptera, parasitoids, Aphidiidae, Hymenoptera, integrated management, Brussels sprouts, indirect plant, defence, tritrophic interaction, METHYL SALICYLATE, ARABIDOPSIS-THALIANA, PLANT-RESPONSES, PARASITIC, WASP, RESISTANCE, BENZOTHIADIAZOLE, ATTRACTION, INDUCTION, EXUDATE, INSECTS

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