Accessibility navigation


The placenta is simply a neuroendocrine parasite

Lowry, P. J. (2008) The placenta is simply a neuroendocrine parasite. Journal of Neuroendocrinology, 20 (6). pp. 700-704. ISSN 0953-8194

Full text not archived in this repository.

To link to this article DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2826.2008.01737.x

Abstract/Summary

This paper will document the early scientific observations that kindled my neuroendocrinological interest in pre-eclampsia, a life-threatening disease that affects both mother and baby. My interest in this subject started with the placental origin of melanotrophin activity, moving on, through corticotrophin-releasing factor and its binding protein, to a tachykinin modified specifically in the placenta by phosphocholine, a post-translational moiety normally used by parasites to avoid immune surveillance and rejection. This work may finally have led to an understanding of the identity of the elusive placental factor that, whilst attempting to compensate for the poor implantation of the placenta, causes the many symptoms seen in the mother during pre-eclampsia.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Biological Sciences
ID Code:9845
Uncontrolled Keywords:melanotrophin, corticotrophin-releasing factor, neurokinin B, phosphocholine, CORTICOTROPIN-RELEASING HORMONE, CTP-PHOSPHOCHOLINE, CYTIDYLYLTRANSFERASE, NEUROKININ-B, BINDING-PROTEIN, SUBSTANCE-P, TACHYKININS, IDENTIFICATION, PREGNANCY, GLYCOPROTEIN, PREECLAMPSIA

Centaur Editors: Update this record

Page navigation