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Lives, Livelihoods & Diaspora: The Migration Experiences & Livelihood Strategies of Professional Nepali Migrants & Their Families in the UK

Khanal, P. (2021) Lives, Livelihoods & Diaspora: The Migration Experiences & Livelihood Strategies of Professional Nepali Migrants & Their Families in the UK. PhD thesis, University of Reading

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Abstract/Summary

This doctoral research is designed around two interrelated aims: Firstly, it aims to explore the livelihood opportunities and strategies of professional first and second generation Nepali migrants and their families in the UK, in order to understand the importance of education, knowledge, social networks and employment in shaping their social mobility and other livelihood outcomes. Secondly, it examines how a small sample of return migrants have transferred their qualifications, knowledge, labour market experiences and social and professional networks to develop new livelihood strategies in Nepal and the research considers how this knowledge transfer may contribute towards the future development prospects of Nepal. Drawing on qualitative in-depth interviews with 40 Nepali participants, 30 residents in the UK and 10 returnees in Nepal, the research draws on livelihoods approaches to explore how the everyday lives and social mobility of professional Nepali migrants are shaped by both tangible improvements in higher education and professional knowledge, as well as more intangible assets, such as entrepreneurism, that have the potential to contribute to Nepali development on return. The research also assesses the important contributions migrants’ make towards the future development prospects of Nepal and it concludes with suggestions for further research and recommendations to support the Nepali diaspora. It is hoped that this research will fill a much needed gap in the empirical research and published scholarship on the professional Nepali diaspora community in the UK.

Item Type:Thesis (PhD)
Thesis Supervisor:Potter, R. and Lloyd-Evans, S.
Thesis/Report Department:School of Archaeology, Geography & Environmental Science
Identification Number/DOI:
Divisions:Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science
ID Code:99075

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