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A Qualitative Investigation of the Life Stories of Sixteen Saudi Arabian People who Stutter (PWS)

Bukhari, R. S. Y. (2021) A Qualitative Investigation of the Life Stories of Sixteen Saudi Arabian People who Stutter (PWS). PhD thesis, University of Reading

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To link to this item DOI: 10.48683/1926.00100429

Abstract/Summary

Stuttering is a speech impediment that some people have to deal with in their everyday life. Recently, greater focus has been given to the influence of stuttering on the quality of life of individuals with stuttering. However, the lived experience of stuttering as understood by people who stutter (PWS) has not been subjected to much qualitative inquiry; this would enable stuttering’s effect on PWS’ lives—or lack of effect—and the impediment’s meaning to them to be understood. The focus of this study is to explore the lived experience among Saudi Arabian PWS, resolving shortcomings in the extant research through listening to the voices of PWS. The study is framed using the Social Relational Model of Disability (SRMD) as the lens for interpreting data. The method of data collection and analysis was the life story approach. 16 Saudi Arabian PWS between the ages of 18 and 57—eight women and eight men—participated in the life story interview process. The lived experiences of stuttering from the perspective of people who stutter involved stories related to stuttering in educational, professional and social contexts, with educator and parental assistance influencing the way they perceived their experience. The participants reconstructed their life stories by adopting different types of narrative, including narratives of difficulties, acceptance and multiple selves. PWS’ lived experience may be impeded due to their interaction with social obstacles, insufficient assistance and negative stereotyping in the education system, work, and domestic environments. Implications of this for how society might more positively embrace PWS are discussed.

Item Type:Thesis (PhD)
Thesis Supervisor:Flynn, N. and Tissot, C.
Thesis/Report Department:Institute of Education
Identification Number/DOI:https://doi.org/10.48683/1926.00100429
Divisions:Arts, Humanities and Social Science > Institute of Education > Language and Literacy in Education
ID Code:100429

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