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Green walls in schools - the potential well-being benefits

Gunn, C., Vahdati, M. and Shahrestani, M. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8741-0912 (2022) Green walls in schools - the potential well-being benefits. Building and Environment, 224. 109560. ISSN 0360-1323

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.buildenv.2022.109560

Abstract/Summary

It is widely acknowledged that mental health disorders in children are increasing and that they are spending more time within the built environment. This paper explores the potential benefits of implementing interior green walls in schools on the anxiety, stress, mood and well-being of children. Analysis of primary data was conducted to broaden the understanding of exterior and interior nature elements currently used in London elementary schools. Secondary data was collected and analysed to explore the impacts of indoor plants, interior green walls and nature views on anxiety, stress, mood and well-being. Additionally, secondary data was analysed to explore the hypothesis that the length of exposure to a nature element impacts positively on well-being. The key findings indicate that nature elements do immediately reduce levels of stress, anxiety and increase well-being and mood. Stress and anxiety levels were most positively influenced in the presence of a window view and indoor plants. While the benefits of the nature element on mood and well-being were noted to reduce after 2–5 weeks of exposure. This research highlights the benefits of introducing nature elements into the built environment in order to increase well-being for elementary school age children, however, further research is required to ensure these benefits are maximised.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Science > School of the Built Environment > Energy and Environmental Engineering group
ID Code:107185
Publisher:Elsevier

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