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A meta-analytic investigation of the potential for plant volatiles and sex pheromones to enhance detection and management of Lepidopteran pests

Staton, T. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0597-0121 and Williams, D. T. (2023) A meta-analytic investigation of the potential for plant volatiles and sex pheromones to enhance detection and management of Lepidopteran pests. Bulletin of Entomological Research. ISSN 0007-4853

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1017/S0007485323000457

Abstract/Summary

Effective early detection, monitoring and management methods are critical for reducing the impacts of insect pests in agriculture and forestry. Combining host plant volatiles with sex pheromones could enhance trapping methodologies, whilst the use of non-host volatiles could improve the effectiveness of pest management through repellency effects. In this meta-analysis approach, we analysed 51 studies that used electroantennograms (EAG), wind tunnels and/or field traps to evaluate the antennal and behavioural responses of Lepidoptera to sex pheromones combined with attractant or repellent plant volatiles. Proposed attractant plant volatiles had a positive association with female Lepidoptera responses to sex pheromone, but effects on males were highly variable, with unexpected repellency reported in some studies. Proposed repellent plant volatiles were significantly or near-significantly negatively associated with male attraction to sex pheromones but were scarcely studied. Sub-group analysis identified that male responses to sex pheromone were reduced when the dose of attractant plant volatile relative to sex pheromone was increased. Green-leaf volatiles were associated with the strongest positive effects for males in field traps. Multiple-compound attractant plant volatile blends were less effective than single compounds in field studies. Our analysis demonstrates, (i) the potential value of combining host plant volatiles with sex pheromones to capture females rather than only males, (ii) the importance of identifying appropriate host plant volatiles and optimal relative doses, and (iii) the potential for non-host plant volatile use in pest management strategies.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Life Sciences > School of Agriculture, Policy and Development > Department of Agri-Food Economics & Marketing
ID Code:113733
Publisher:Cambridge University Press

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