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Using fractionation profile of potentially toxic elements in soils to investigate their accumulation in Tilia sp. leaves in urban areas with different pollution levels

Mitrovic, M., Blanusa, T., Pavlovic, M., Pavlovic, D., Kostic, O., Perovic, V., Jaric, S. and Pavlovic, P. (2021) Using fractionation profile of potentially toxic elements in soils to investigate their accumulation in Tilia sp. leaves in urban areas with different pollution levels. Sustainability, 13 (17). 9784. ISSN 2071-1050 (In Press)

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To link to this item DOI: 10.3390/su13179784

Abstract/Summary

Optimal uptake of micronutrients (B, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn) and managing the potentially toxic elements (PTEs) (Co, Cr, Ni, Pb, and Sr) in the ranges not detrimental to plant function may be linked to improving plants’ healthy growth and the ability to provide ecosystem services. We investigated concentrations, mobility, and potential availability of potentially toxic elements (PTEs) in soil samples from polluted and non-polluted municipal parks in Reading (UK) and Belgrade (Serbia) and their impact on elemental concentrations in Tilia leaves. We aimed to identify common limiting factors potentially affecting the growth/healthy function of this widely-used tree species. Levels of all elements in soil were below limits established by the directive of European Communities, except for Ni at Belgrade sites. Content of Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, and Zn in soluble fraction at all locations was <10%, indicating low mobility; B showed moderate mobility (11.1%–20.7%), Mn (6.5%–55.6%), and Sr—high (44%–76.3%). Principal Component Analysis of Tilia leaf tissues showed a different capacity for uptake/accumulation of PTEs in different locations. Findings indicate the complexity of local edaphic influences on plants’ elemental uptake and the risk of those leading to deficiency of important micronutrients, which may impede trees’ function and thus the ability to optimally provide ecosystem services.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Life Sciences > School of Agriculture, Policy and Development > Biodiversity, Crops and Agroecosystems Division > Crops Research Group
ID Code:100019
Uncontrolled Keywords:lime trees; potentially toxic elements (PTEs); optimized BCR sequential procedure; PTEs fractionation profile; urban parks; urban soils
Publisher:MPDI

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