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Development and application of diazirines in biological and synthetic macromolecular systems

Blencowe, A. and Hayes, W. (2005) Development and application of diazirines in biological and synthetic macromolecular systems. Soft Matter, 1 (3). pp. 178-205. ISSN 1744-683X

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1039/b501989c

Abstract/Summary

Many different reagents and methodologies have been utilised for the modification of synthetic and biological macromolecular systems. In addition, an area of intense research at present is the construction of hybrid biosynthetic polymers, comprised of biologically active species immobilised or complexed with synthetic polymers. One of the most useful and widely applicable techniques available for functionalisation of macromolecular systems involves indiscriminate carbene insertion processes. The highly reactive and non-specific nature of carbenes has enabled a multitude of macromolecular structures to be functionalised without the need for specialised reagents or additives. The use of diazirines as stable carbene precursors has increased dramatically over the past twenty years and these reagents are fast becoming the most popular photophors for photoaffinity labelling and biological applications in which covalent modification of macromolecular structures is the basis to understanding structure-activity relationships. This review reports the synthesis and application of a diverse range of diazirines in macromolecular systems.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Chemistry
ID Code:11041
Uncontrolled Keywords:NICOTINIC ACETYLCHOLINE-RECEPTOR, PROTEIN-KINASE-C, CORTICOTROPIN-RELEASING-FACTOR, CROSS-LINKING REAGENT, 50S, RIBOSOMAL-SUBUNIT, MYELIN BASIC-PROTEIN, BIOTINYLATED LACTOSYLCERAMIDE, ANALOG, HYDROPHOBIC PHOTOREACTIVE PROBES, INFLUENZA-VIRUS, HEMAGGLUTININ, ANGIOTENSIN-CONVERTING ENZYME

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