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A pulse radiolysis study of free radicals formed by one-electron oxidation of the antimalarial drug pyronaridine

Ismail, F.M.D., Drew, M.G.B., Navaratnam, S. and Bisby, R.H. (2009) A pulse radiolysis study of free radicals formed by one-electron oxidation of the antimalarial drug pyronaridine. Research on Chemical Intermediates, 35 (4). pp. 363-377. ISSN 0922-6168

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1007/s11164-009-0051-7

Abstract/Summary

Free radicals from one-electron oxidation of the antimalarial drug pyronaridine have been studied by pulse radiolysis. The results show that pyronaridine is readily oxidised to an intermediate semi-iminoquine radical by inorganic and organic free radicals, including those derived from tryptophan and acetaminophen. The pyronaridine radical is rapidly reduced by both ascorbate and caffeic acid. The results indicate that the one-electron reduction potential of the pyronaridine radical at neutral pH lies between those of acetaminophen (707 mV) and caffeic acid (534 mV). The pyronaridine radical decays to produce the iminoquinone, detected by electrospray mass spectrometry, in a second-order process that density functional theory (DFT) calculations (UB3LYP/6-31+G*) suggest is a disproportionation reaction. Important calculated dimensions of pyronaridine, its phenoxyl and aminyl radical, as well as the iminoquinone, are presented.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Chemistry
ID Code:11357
Uncontrolled Keywords:Pyronaridine, Free radical, Pulse radiolysis, Oxidation, DFT, Antimalarial , PLASMODIUM-FALCIPARUM, REDOX POTENTIALS, MALARIA PIGMENT, BETA-HEMATIN, IN-VITRO, AMODIAQUINE, METABOLISM, SEMIQUINONE, MECHANISMS, GENERATION

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