Accessibility navigation


Systematic distortions of perceptual stability investigated using immersive virtual reality

Tcheang, L., Gilson, S. J. and Glennerster, A. (2005) Systematic distortions of perceptual stability investigated using immersive virtual reality. Vision Research, 45 (16). pp. 2177-2189. ISSN 0042-6989

Full text not archived in this repository.

To link to this article DOI: 10.1016/j.visres.2005.02.006

Abstract/Summary

Using an immersive virtual reality system, we measured the ability of observers to detect the rotation of an object when its movement was yoked to the observer's own translation. Most subjects had a large bias such that a static object appeared to rotate away from them as they moved. Thresholds for detecting target rotation were similar to those for an equivalent speed discrimination task carried out by static observers, suggesting that visual discrimination is the predominant limiting factor in detecting target rotation. Adding a stable visual reference frame almost eliminated the bias. Varying the viewing distance of the target had little effect, consistent with observers underestimating distance walked. However, accuracy of walking to a briefly presented visual target was high and not consistent with an underestimation of distance walked. We discuss implications for theories of a task-independent representation of visual space. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences
ID Code:13844
Uncontrolled Keywords:3-D perception, stability, allocentric, reference frame , VISUAL-PERCEPTION, MOTION PARALLAX, DISTANCE PERCEPTION, BINOCULAR DISPARITY, PERCEIVED DISTANCE, GUIDED LOCOMOTION, DIRECTED ACTION, EYE-MOVEMENTS, DEPTH, INFORMATION

University Staff: Request a correction | Centaur Editors: Update this record

Page navigation