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Mental rotation in Williams syndrome: an impaired ability

Stinton, C., Farran, E.K. and Courbois, Y. (2008) Mental rotation in Williams syndrome: an impaired ability. Developmental Neuropsychology, 33 (5). pp. 565-583. ISSN 8756-5641

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1080/87565640802254323

Abstract/Summary

Typically developing young children and individuals with intellectual disabilities often perform poorly on mental rotation tasks when the stimulus they are rotating lacks a salient component. However. performance can he improved when salience is increased. The present study investigated the effect of salience oil mental rotation performance by individuals with Williams syndrome. Individuals with Williams syndrome and matched controls were presented with two versions of a mental rotation task: a no salient component condition and a salient component condition. The results showed that component salience did not benefit individuals with Williams syndrome in the same manner as it did controls.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences
ID Code:13855
Uncontrolled Keywords:DEVELOPMENTAL TRAJECTORIES, SYNDROME PHENOTYPE, NEURAL MECHANISMS, CHILDRENS ABILITY, WORKING-MEMORY, YOUNG-CHILDREN, TERM-MEMORY, IMAGERY, MOTION, FACE

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