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The effect of postnatal depression on mother-infant interaction, infant response to the still-face perturbation, and performance on an instrumental learning task

Stanley, C., Murray, L. and Stein, A. (2004) The effect of postnatal depression on mother-infant interaction, infant response to the still-face perturbation, and performance on an instrumental learning task. Development and Psychopathology, 16 (1). pp. 1-18. ISSN 1469-2198

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1017/S0954579404044384

Abstract/Summary

A representative community sample of primiparous depressed women and a nondepressed control group were assessed while in interaction with their infants at 2 months postpartum. At 3 months, infants were assessed on the Still-face perturbation of face to face interaction, and a subsample completed an Instrumental Learning paradigm. Compared to nondepressed women, depressed mothers' interactions were both less contingent and less affectively attuned to infant behavior. Postnatal depression did not adversely affect the infant's performance in either the Still-face perturbation or the Instrumental Learning assessment. Maternal responsiveness in interactions at 2 months predicted the infant's performance in the Instrumental Learning assessment but not in the Still-face perturbation. The implications of these findings for theories of infant cognitive and emotional development are discussed.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Winnicott
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences
ID Code:13860
Uncontrolled Keywords:COGNITIVE-DEVELOPMENT, MATERNAL DEPRESSION, BEHAVIOR, CHILDREN, IMPACT, 3-MONTH-OLD, EXPECTANCY, PREDICTORS, COMPETENCE, SITUATION
Publisher:Cambridge University Press

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