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Brief cognitive behavioural therapy for extreme shape concern: an evaluation

Shafran, R., Farrell, C., Lee, M. and Fairburn, C. G. (2009) Brief cognitive behavioural therapy for extreme shape concern: an evaluation. British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 48 (1). pp. 79-92. ISSN 0144-6657

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1348/014466508x360755

Abstract/Summary

Objectives. This study was designed to evaluate a new brief cognitive-behavioural intervention to reduce concerns about body shape. Design. Women with high levels of shape concern (N = 50) were randomly assigned to cognitive behaviour therapy or applied relaxation (AR). Baseline assessments were made and then women received their treatment immediately after this assessment, ('immediate' treatment) or 5 weeks after this assessment, during which time no treatment was given ('delayed' treatment, DT). Methods. Shape concern and related cognitions and emotions were assessed at baseline, post-treatment and at 4 and 12 week follow-up (FU). Results. Immediate treatment was superior to DT in reducing shape concerns, and this difference was maintained at 4 week FU. The cognitive behavioural intervention was more effective than AR in changing shape concern and this difference was largely maintained for 3 months. Conclusions. These initial findings support the further investigation of this brief intervention.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences
ID Code:13873
Uncontrolled Keywords:BODY-IMAGE DISTURBANCE, EATING-DISORDERS, BULIMIA-NERVOSA, ANOREXIA-NERVOSA, VIDEO FEEDBACK, WEIGHT CONTROL, SELF-REPORT, PREVENTION, DEPRESSION, DISSATISFACTION

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