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Does incongruence of lexicosemantic and prosodic information cause discernible cognitive conflict?

Mitchell, R.L.C. (2006) Does incongruence of lexicosemantic and prosodic information cause discernible cognitive conflict? Cognitive Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience, 6 (4). pp. 298-305. ISSN 1530-7026

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To link to this article DOI: 10.3758/CABN.6.4.291

Abstract/Summary

We are often required to interpret discordant emotional signals. Whereas equivalent cognitive paradigms cause noticeable conflict via their behavioral and psychophysiological effects, the same may not necessarily be true for discordant emotions. Skin conductance responses (SCRs) and heart rates (HRs) were measured during a classic Stroop task and one in which the emotions conveyed by lexicosemantic content and prosody were congruent or incongruent. The participants' task was to identify the emotion conveyed by lexicosemantic content or prosody. No relationship was observed between HR and congruence. SCR was higher during incongruent than during congruent conditions of the experimental task (as well as in the classic Stroop task), but no difference in SCR was observed in a comparison between congruence effects during lexicosemantic emotion identification and those during prosodic emotion identification. It is concluded that incongruence between lexicosemantic and prosodic emotion does cause notable cognitive conflict. Functional neuroanatomic implications are discussed.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences
ID Code:13930
Uncontrolled Keywords:ANTERIOR CINGULATE CORTEX, SPEECH-PERCEPTION, HEMISPHERE ASYMMETRY, EMOTIONAL SPEECH, STROOP, INTERFERENCE, RESPONSES, BRAIN, TASK, WORD

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