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Reversing the emotional Stroop effect reveals that it is not what it seems: the role of fast and slow components

McKenna, F. P. and Sharma, D. (2004) Reversing the emotional Stroop effect reveals that it is not what it seems: the role of fast and slow components. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning Memory and Cognition, 30 (2). pp. 382-392. ISSN 0278-7393

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1037/0278-7393.30.2.382

Abstract/Summary

The relative contributions of slow and fast (online) components in a modified emotional Stroop task were evaluated. The slow component, neglected in previous research, was shown to lead to the prediction of a reversed emotional intrusion effect using pseudorandomly mixed negative and neutral stimuli. This prediction was supported in Experiments 1 and 2. In Experiments 3 and 4, a new paradigm was developed that allowed a more direct observation of the nature of disruptive effects from negative stimuli. The results provided a clear demonstration of the presence of the slow component. The fast component, which has generally been assumed to be the source of the interference, was shown, in fact, to have little or no role in the disruption.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences
ID Code:13942
Uncontrolled Keywords:THREAT CUES, TASK, INFORMATION, WORDS, PERFORMANCE, COGNITIONS, ATTENTION, DISORDER, ANXIETY, POWER

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